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    Rembrandt in Vermeer's Studio

    Rembrandt was my first influence and in this illustration I pay my respects to him, Vermeer and Dali all at once. A weird mix, I know, but I just couldn’t help myself. “The Persistence of Memory” on a tapestry is something I would still like to have!

    My love of art history and research drove my design.

    24″x36″, Verithin clay-based color pencils on Bristol Board

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    Portia

    I love Shakespeare. In my last year at my university I read all of the plays and fell in love with many of his characters. Portia, from “The Merchant of Venice” always intrigued me because of her intelligence and ability to plan. I am especially proud of the model’s lovely face and delicate hand.

    My love of art history and research drove my design.

    24″x36″, Verithin clay-based color pencils on Bristol Board

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    The Psychologist's Tree

    This image represents one of my first forays into digital art. Using techniques learned over many years, I made an alpha-selection of this dormant, exotic tree and built the rest from imagination.

    10″x8″, Photoshop, giclee on fine art paper, printed in limited edition at Digital Pond, San Francisco (special thanks to Norm Nichol

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    Gravity

    Long before most people had heard of Adobe Photoshop, Kodak created its Center for Creative Imaging in Camden, Maine. It was a unique opportunity to study Photoshop techniques with imaging stars like David Biedney and Bert Monroy. I was fortunate to have studied with these imaging professionals.

    This image started as a snapshot of the “Barber’s Stone” at the Avesbury Standing Circle in the midlands of Great Britain and ended floating above manufactured water and a Wyoming cloudscape.

    8″x10″, Photoshop 2 and a variety of output devices, David Biedney throwing very hard Jolly Roger candies to keep us all awake during an intense week-long study at Kodak’s Center for Creative Imaging

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    Tah-Dah!

    For nearly two years it was my great pleasure to create a weekly cartoon strip. This is the last frame in the last strip. It was my personal way of saying goodbye to characters I created and the good times I had while creating the strip.

    I really cracked myself up, but unfortunately, not everyone agreed I was funny, so this is the way the cartoon strip eventually ended. I learned so much during this process, read many books about being funny (it must not have worked) and had a blast. Thank you to my client, Taco John’s; you guys are the best!

    17″x11″, cartoonist board, India ink, brush and pen

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    At the Barber Shop

    For nearly two years it was my great pleasure to create a weekly cartoon strip.

    My sponsor, Taco John’s International, was very supportive while I learned my way around the tooning trade. I worked with traditional cartoonist’s board (photo-sensitive half-tone board that blackened with a special developer), ink and brush for the characters and Rapidiograph pens for the lettering.

    I really cracked myself up, but unfortunately, not everyone agreed I was funny, so the cartoon strip eventually ended. Some of the references are dated, but you may still recognize a few of the characters.

    17″x11″, cartoonist board, India ink, brush and pen

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    Mike, the Santa

    For nearly two years it was my great pleasure to create a weekly cartoon strip.

    My sponsor, Taco John’s International, was very supportive while I learned my way around the tooning trade. I worked with traditional cartoonist’s board (photo-sensitive half-tone board that blackened with a special developer), ink and brush for the characters and Rapidiograph pens for the lettering.

    I really cracked myself up, but unfortunately, not everyone agreed I was funny, so the cartoon strip eventually ended. Some of the references are dated, but you may still recognize a few of the characters.

    17″x11″, cartoonist board, India ink, brush and pen

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    In Line, Number Two

    For nearly two years it was my great pleasure to create a weekly cartoon strip.

    My sponsor, Taco John’s International, was very supportive while I learned my way around the tooning trade. I worked with traditional cartoonist’s board (photo-sensitive half-tone board that blackened with a special developer), ink and brush for the characters and Rapidiograph pens for the lettering.

    I really cracked myself up, but unfortunately, not everyone agreed I was funny, so the cartoon strip eventually ended. Some of the references are dated, but you may still recognize a few of the characters.

    7″x11″, cartoonist board, India ink, brush and pen

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    In Line, Number One

    For nearly two years it was my great pleasure to create a weekly cartoon strip.

    My sponsor, Taco John’s International, was very supportive while I learned my way around the tooning trade. I worked with traditional cartoonist’s board (photo-sensitive dot board that blackened with a special developer), ink and brush for the characters and Rapidiograph pens for the lettering.

    I really cracked myself up, but unfortunately, not everyone agreed I was funny, so the cartoon strip eventually ended. Some of the references are dated, but you may still recognize a few of the characters.
    17″x11″, cartoonist board, India ink, brush and pen

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    Shemp Howard

    This is one of my few remaining caricatures, a pencil drawing of Shemp Howard from the Three Stooges.
    8.5″x11″, graphite on drawing paper

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